LEN DEIGHTON ACTION COOKBOOK PDF

Action Cook Book, UK first edition, Action Cook Book - Summary Eighty original recipes from the series Deighton produced for The Observer newspaper between and are reproduced in this, his most famous - and revolutionary - cookbook. The strips cover a lot of English-sourced recipes that complement his later French recipe collection. Written in a simple step-by-step style, clearly aimed at an audience of men unskilled at knowing their way around the kitchen. Deighton demonstrates his knowledge as a gourmand; as well as being an accomplished chef, he grew up with a food background as his mother was a cook. The design is clearly aimed to appeal to the sixties bachelor - the front cover features a pistol with a sprig of parsley in the barrel. It assumes little knowledge; it offers recipes but also gives advice with illustrations on such subjects as why a refrigerator is a good thing to have in a kitchen really!

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He is someone who knows his food and reflects that in his writing. It is his cookstrips - little cartoons he created for himself to follow recipes without needing a cook book to hand - that ensure Len Deighton, the writer, a place in the annals of food writing and cooking, revolutionary as they were in providing a new take on the communication of cooking techniques to a wide public audience.

His Action Cookbook and subsequent other books - all built to some extent upon this simple innovation - demonstrated not only his unique application of design and illustration to cooking but his impeccable taste and knowledge of gastronomy and the science of food.

The books in this section reflect the contribution Deighton has made to food communications, something frequently reflected in the positive regard cooks and food writers have for his cook strips and their impact on the amateur chef.

While many of them adapt the original cookstrip idea and develop it further with each subsequent edition, some of the later books Deighton wrote on food were broader appreciations of the French cooking culture with which he had developed his culinary skills in the nineteen-fifties in London and Paris. All of these cookbooks remain well-regarded among food writers, with the Action Cookbook frequently appearing in lists of the most influential cookery books of the last century.

Action Cook Book Action Cookbook Summary Eighty original recipes from the series Deighton produced for The Observer newspaper between and are reproduced in this, his most famous - and revolutionary - cookbook.

The strips cover a lot of English-sourced recipes that complement his later French recipe collection. Written in a simple step-by-step style, clearly aimed at an audience of men unskilled at knowing their way around the kitchen. Deighton demonstrates his knowledge as a gourmand; as well as being an accomplished chef, he grew up with a food background as his mother was a cook.

The design is clearly aimed to appeal to the sixties bachelor - the front cover features a pistol with a sprig of parsley in the barrel. It assumes little knowledge; it offers recipes but also gives advice with illustrations on such subjects as why a refrigerator is a good thing to have in a kitchen really! The quality of the advice is first class, and many of the recipes would not look out of place on the menu of a gourmet restaurant.

In the staid world of sixties cookery writing, this unique approach was a revelation and made Deighton as famous for cooking as for his novels, in the sixties. The recipes show a real level of sophistication and are testament to his status as a gourmand.

When meat is heated it shrinks in bulk. This means that it can no longer hold the same moisture-content and the moisture escapes. The object of a cook must be to minimise this escape. The simplest way of cooking meat is to put it in the oven, where radiant heat dries the moisture as it comes to the surface of the meat. Everyone appreciates and prefers the outside juice-encrusted slices. Similarly, grilling will bring moisture to the surface.

Many cooks prefer to sprinkle the outside of meat with flour in order that these juices should dry rather than drip to the bottom of the pan. A new selection of cook strips developed with his son Antoni now runs in The Observer food magazine each month in In this article by Robin Strummer from December , Len Deighton recalls his background in food and explains the practical reasons why he started writing the cook strips and the secret of their sustained popularity.

That dealt with all sorts of cookery skills, including the basics. This volume is focused on collating the cookstrips which dealt with French cooking, which in the sixties was seen as the basis of all haute cuisine.

There is no hint of pretence, no suggestion that Deighton has not at some point tried every one of the recipes in this book and is prepared to eat every part of every animal he cooks: "a pound of necks and a pound of gizzards and hearts will make a fine stock.

This book came out only three years after his first book, demonstrating the marketing power of a writer who could switch between two separate markets without any loss of recognition. The finest - lard gras - is from the fat of the loin of the pig. It is also cut into strips, called lardons, that are stitched through meat that would otherwise be dry.

The layer below that is easier to melt and is used for cooking; particularly popular in S. Saindoux is find for pastry making. Other parts of a pig, e. The latter is called lard maigre. When studying at the Royal College of Art, Deighton worked in restaurants, and created the strips as a useful way to pin up the essential facts of a recipe in the kitchen.

Turning them into a column was suggested by Raymond Hawkey. Little if anything has been changed about the books. The cover of the Action Cook Book introduce a man being watched by a woman as he cooks - making much more of the cooking for macho men angle which had developed around the book.

This subsequently was reprinted in hardback in as French Cooking for Men, using this cover image. Similarly, Ou Est Le Garlic? The cardboard slip cover lays out a whole range of traditional ingredients used in both books. Both books maintain his stylistic illustrations, characterised by heavy black outlining to each element, well spaced out even on what is a smaller page format than the first edition in both cases.

When you use cloves with meat e. Pork of all kinds goes well with it, as it cuts down the richness rather as an apple sauce does.

For example, there is a chapter called La Carte des sauces, which offers a guide through the complex world of sauces. It starts off with the basic sauces: brown, white, bechamel, fish, and egg and butter sauces, giving clear instructions about exactly how the chefs des sauces in French restaurants do it. From these basic sauces, Deighton then provides some variations which form the basis of most modern French cuisine.

Nothing is left out; there is guidance on choosing chickens, the best implements to have in your kitchen and good wines. Nothing is left to chance. The text and the cookstrips are slightly larger in this edition than in the paperback and, therefore, visually more impressive. The importance of French cookery is not only due to the taste, texture and appearance of the resulting dishes, but also to the systematic way in which generations of cooks have ordered and classified their knowledge.

It is not a complete dictionary or a cookery course, but more a paean to la cuisine francaise which Deighton clearly loves with a passion, based on the descriptions of the food and the culture which supports the cuisine. This book he wrote with his heart. The reader certainly gleans some unusual facts about food and learns to understand why the French regard their cuisine as in la premiere classe.

When I was a student a plate of steam mussels provided the cheapest protein food available. They are easy to prepare. For moules mariniere put clean, scrubbed, closed mussels into a tightly closed pot, together with a glass of white wine, a finely chopped shallot and garlic, if you like it, and chopped parsley. After a few minutes on a very high heat the steam will have opened the shells. Discard any that are closed and the mussels are ready to eat. But mussels grow fat in polluted water.

Buy them from a reliable source. Of the book he says: "[its] intentionally limited scope makes it a relaxing read and the author is never far away behind his explanations and always ready to let the reader know his likes and dislikes. The mock-up of the front cover is different to the edition that actually emerged.

The book is described by Deighton as essentially an edited version of his loose-leaf notebook from art school, filled with scribbles and observations made when Deighton worked in kitchens while studying. The text is slightly different in places, but the fundamental focus on the cookstrips and getting the basics of cookery right remain.

The cover photograph of one of the cookstrips and some garlic - a nod to its antecedent - is by Behram Kapadia.

That is called mijoter and as far as the cook is concerned the water is boiling. Beware, the cook seldom wants anything boiling. If the water gets very hot it will go into a great rolling boil - bouillir - which is fine for reducing the volume of liquids but not for very much else. However, the front cover they eventually went with differs from the design depicted on the earlier volume. Proving the quality of the original concept, nearly sixty years after they first appeared, cookstrips have - since - run again in The Observer Food Monthly Magazine.

This time, Deighton is producing them in partnership with his son, Alex. The concept is still as fresh as it was when they originally appeared - simple instructions, clear illustrations, no jargon, and straightforward, often classic recipes.

However, all good cooks will turn at one time or another to other cooks and food writers for inspiration. Here, writing exclusively for the Deighton Dossier, Len sets out his own favourite, go-to cookbooks: "In The Observer asked me to resume production of the cookstrips and they are now appear each month in The Observer Food Monthly.

My son Alex Bebop Deighton works with me and tests and modifies each and every one. I have had many readers ask me what are my favourite cookery books. I possess hundreds of cookery books, so I have listed the books to which I go most often. I also did a book called The ABC of French Food which my publishers have, for reasons unexplained to me, not reprinted.

It is available from internet retailers and I hope it fills a place in the bookshelves of serious cooks and even those who enjoy reading menus. Below are some of the books to which I frequently turn.

They are not all recipe books. Corriher combines recipes with the theories upon which they depend. One of the Pepin books is an autobiography, but wonderfully informative for all cooks.

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The Deighton Dossier

He is someone who knows his food and reflects that in his writing. It is his cookstrips - little cartoons he created for himself to follow recipes without needing a cook book to hand - that ensure Len Deighton, the writer, a place in the annals of food writing and cooking, revolutionary as they were in providing a new take on the communication of cooking techniques to a wide public audience. His Action Cookbook and subsequent other books - all built to some extent upon this simple innovation - demonstrated not only his unique application of design and illustration to cooking but his impeccable taste and knowledge of gastronomy and the science of food. The books in this section reflect the contribution Deighton has made to food communications, something frequently reflected in the positive regard cooks and food writers have for his cook strips and their impact on the amateur chef. While many of them adapt the original cookstrip idea and develop it further with each subsequent edition, some of the later books Deighton wrote on food were broader appreciations of the French cooking culture with which he had developed his culinary skills in the nineteen-fifties in London and Paris. All of these cookbooks remain well-regarded among food writers, with the Action Cookbook frequently appearing in lists of the most influential cookery books of the last century. Action Cook Book Action Cookbook Summary Eighty original recipes from the series Deighton produced for The Observer newspaper between and are reproduced in this, his most famous - and revolutionary - cookbook.

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